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Daily Trivia [More]
(1800-36)
Early Republic
Who supported British regulars in manpower during the War of 1812?
  1. The French

  2. Local Militias

  3. Loyalist Americans

  4. Acadians

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Daily Colonial Quote

More notable sayings can be found in the Colonial Quotes section
That government is best which governs the least, because its people discipline themselves.
-- Thomas Jefferson


Latest Activity
Today8 Census People added/edited
01/30/1531 Census People added/edited
2 Timeline and/or Link entries added/edited
01/29/1556 Census People added/edited
01/28/15168 Census People added/edited
2 Timeline and/or Link entries added/edited
01/27/152 Broadsheets added
2 Calendar Events added/edited
2 Census Links added/edited
7 Timeline and/or Link entries added/edited
 

 
Recent Articles on Colonial Sense
WhatWhereWhen
Journey to America: Chapter 19Regional History: Journals01/25/15
New England Weather: 1747-48 WinterSociety-Lifestyle: Signs of the Times01/05/15
Barring OutSociety-Lifestyle: Holidays12/25/14
Two Colonial Gems, John Chads House and the Barns-Brinton HouseArchitecture: Houses12/22/14
Journey to America: Chapter 18Regional History: Journals12/10/14
New England Weather: 1755 Great EarthquakeSociety-Lifestyle: Signs of the Times11/21/14
October, 2014Antiques: Auction Results11/06/14
Journey to America: Chapter 17Regional History: Journals10/28/14
September, 2014Antiques: Auction Results10/06/14
Stenciling: Download PatternsHow-To Guides: Interior09/23/14

 
This Day in Colonial History -- January 31st:
click on      for links to additional information; or go to the Timeline for more events
 •  1504-By the Treaty of Lyons, French cede Naples to Ferdinand of Aragon
 •  1531-Kings Ferdinand of Austria/Janos Zapolyai of Hungary accept each other 
 •  1560-Spanish king Philip II marries Elisabeth van Valois 
 •  1578-Battle of Gembloux -- Spain beats Protestant rebels
 •  1596-Catholic League disjoins 
 •  1606-Guy Fawkes jumps to his death moments before his execution for treason
 •  1609-Wisselbank of Amsterdam established 
 •  1627-Spanish government goes bankrupt 
 •  1675-Cornelia and Dina Olfaarts found not guilty of witchcraft during Salem witch trials 
 •  1679-Jean-Baptiste Lully's opera Bellerophon premieres in Paris
 •  1696-Revolt of undertakers after funeral reforms (Amsterdam) 
 •  1752-Gouverneur Morris is born in New York
 •  1779-Charles Messier adds M57 (Ring Nebula in Lyra) to his catalog 
 •  1797-Franz Schubert is born
 •  1804-British Vice-Admiral William Blighs fleet reaches Curacao 
 •  1817-Franz Grillparzer's Die Ahnfrau premieres in Vienna 
 •  1842-John Tyler's daughter Elizabeth marries William Nevison Waller in the White House
 •  1849-Corn Laws abolished in Britain 
 •  1851-Gail Borden announces invention of evaporated milk 
  -San Franciso Orphan's Asylum, first in California, founded 
 •  1854-Dutch KNMI established (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute)
 •  1855-Western railroads blocked by snow 
 

 
Latest Broadsheets -- Daily news from around the world about the Early Modern Era
Older articles can be found in the Broadsheet Archive
posted on Colonial Sense: 01/27/2015 -- Followup
Experts examine bones as Spain hunts for Cervantes' remains
January 24, 2015, The Associated Press by Jorge Sainz and Harold Heckle
Forensic experts began excavating graves and examining bones Saturday in a tiny chapel in Madrid, hoping to solve the centuries-old mystery of exactly where the great Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes was laid to rest.

The author of "Don Quixote" was buried in 1616 at the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians in Madrid's historic Barrio de las Letras, or Literary Quarter, but the exact whereabouts of his grave within the convent chapel are unknown.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/27/2015
Broken Promises On Display At Native American Treaties Exhibit
January 18, 2015, NPR by Hansi Lo Wang
For centuries, treaties have defined the relationship between many Native American nations and the U.S. More than 370 ratified treaties have helped the U.S. expand its territory and led to many broken promises made to American Indians.

A rare exhibit of such treaties at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., looks back at this history. It currently features one of the first compacts between the U.S. and Native American nations – the Treaty of Canandaigua.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/26/2015
Fleeing To Dismal Swamp, Slaves And Outcasts Found Freedom
December 28, 2014, NPR by Sandy Hausman
Most Americans know about the Underground Railroad, the route that allowed Southern slaves to escape North. Some slaves found freedom by hiding closer to home, however — in Great Dismal Swamp. The swamp is a vast wetland in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. In George Washington's time, it was a million acres of trees, dark water, bears, bobcats, snakes and stinging insects. British settlers, who first arrived in 1607, believed the swamp was haunted.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/26/2015
After 522 Years, Spain Seeks To Make Amends For Expulsion Of Jews
December 25, 2014, NPR by Lauren Frayer
As night fell recently over the Spanish city of Toledo, Hanukkah candles lit up empty streets outside the medieval El Transito synagogue.

Jews prospered in medieval Spain, under Muslim and Christian rule. But that changed in 1492, when the Catholic monarchs, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, expelled them.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/25/2015
How the Choctaws Saved the Irish
January 17, 2015, Indian Country Today by Staff
We're overstating the case there—the Choctaws didn't save the Irish, but they sure tried to help. The year was 1847, and the the Great Irish Famine (sometimes called the Irish Potato Famine by non-Irish) was in its second year. Individuals in the Choctaw Nation—with the hardships of The trail of Tears, 16 years earlier, perhaps still in mind—learned of the catastrophe in Ireland and sent copy70 of their own money to help.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/25/2015
The Doctor Who Championed Hand-Washing And Briefly Saved Lives
January 12, 2015, NPR by Rebecca Davis
This is the story of a man whose ideas could have saved a lot of lives and spared countless numbers of women and newborns' feverish and agonizing deaths.

You'll notice I said "could have."

The year was 1846, and our would-be hero was a Hungarian doctor named Ignaz Semmelweis.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/23/2015
Battle of Waterloo: Search for UK soldiers' descendants
January 11, 2015, BBC (UK) by Staff
A search is being launched for Britons whose ancestors fought at Waterloo, on the 200th anniversary of Britain and its allies' victory over Napoleon.

Hundreds of thousands of people in the UK are estimated to have relatives who fought in June 1815.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/23/2015
On the trail of Hernán Cortés
December 20, 2014, The Economist by Staff
THE state of Veracruz, on the Gulf coast, is Mexico at its most fertile. Along the tropical coastline, vast sugar-cane plantations shimmer in the heat. Climb the mountains towards the balmier state capital of Jalapa and the landscape changes into a canopy of coffee plants and orange trees, with cattle and horses grazing. Mexicans will tell you that this natural bounty is the essence of their country. What many fail to realise, though, is that until 500 years ago none of these crops or animals existed in Mexico. Veracruz was the gateway through which they entered, and it was Spaniards who brought them.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/14/2015
Beethoven May Have Composed Masterpieces To His Own Irregular Heartbeat
January 11, 2015, The Huffington Post by Carolyn Gregoire
Many who listen to Beethoven's masterpieces would describe them as deeply heartfelt -- and according to new research, this description may be surprisingly apt.

The unusual rhythms found in some of Beethoven's most iconic works may be linked to the heart condition cardiac arrhythmia, which he is suspected to have had, research from the University of Michigan and University of Washington suggests.

posted on Colonial Sense: 01/14/2015
6 Myths About the Battle of New Orleans
January 08, 2015, History.com by Christopher Klein
Outside New Orleans on January 8, 1815, a badly outnumbered, motley collection of regular soldiers, backcountry riflemen and lawless pirates led by Major General Andrew Jackson scored a lopsided victory against the mighty British army. The surprising triumph not only boosted American pride and transformed Jackson into a national hero, it also quickly became shrouded in mythology. On the bicentennial of the Battle of New Orleans, learn the truth behind six common misconceptions about one of the most famous showdowns of the War of 1812.

 

 
Colonial Sense Stats
Event Calendar Listings: 222Online Resources Links: 604Recipes: 480
Census People: 264Items: 24Links: 18
Inventories Items: 0Pix: 0Links: 0
Dictionary Entries: 1,401Broadsheet Archive: 2,174Food and Farming Items: 199
Timeline Events: Total: 7,749       Tagged: 6,032       With Links: 3,356       Total Links: 3,933
Colonial Quotes: 1,894Trivia Challenge: 293Videos: 93
Downloads:   Articles: 9       Music: 12       Wallpaper: 6       Radio Shows: 5

 
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