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This is the common name given to the root of the Raphanus satious, one of the varieties of the cultivated horseradish. There are red and white radishes; and the French have also what they call violet and black ones, of which the black are the larger. Radishes are composed of nearly the same constituents as turnips, that is to say, mostly fibre and nitrogen; and, being generally eaten raw, it is on the last of these that their flavour depends. They do not agree with people, except those who are in good health, and have active digestive powers; for they are difficult of digestion, and cause flatulency and wind, and are the cause of headaches when eaten to excess. Besides being eaten raw, they are sometimes, but rarely, boiled; and they also serve as a pretty garnish for salads. In China, the radish may be found growing naturally, without cultivation; and may be occasionally met with in England as a weed, in similar places to where the wild turnip grows; it, however, thrives best in the garden, and the ground it likes best is a deep open loam, or a well-manured sandy soil.

Salmon colored is the best, purple next best, then white -- each are produced from southern seeds, annually. They grow thriftiest sown among onions. The turnip Raddish will last well through the winter. Horse Raddish, once in the garden, can scarcely ever be totally eradicated; plowing or digging them up with that view, seems at times, rather to increase and spread them.

Colonial Sense recipes using radish (3)
Comments (3) 
vmehigan
10/17/13
Let's not forget the healing properties of Marigolds (Calendula Officinalis) Copied from the website that I purchase my herbs from (MountainRoseHerbs.com): Calendula officinalis, also known as pot marigold or garden marigold, has been used for centuries to heal wounds and skin irritations. Calendula has anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, astringent, antifungal, antiviral, and immunostimulant properties making it useful for disinfecting and treating minor wounds, conjunctivitis, cuts, scrapes, chapped or chafed skin, bruises, burns, athlete’s foot, acne, yeast infections, bee stings, diaper rashes, and other minor irritations and infections of the skin. Plus, it stimulates the production of collagen at wound sites to help minimize scarring and assist with stretch marks. This versatile botanical can be incorporated into baths, creams, compresses, washes, salves, ointments, massage oils, baths, facial steams, tinctures, and teas. It is also gentle enough to use for babies, children, or animals. Internally, gargling with Calendula infused water may ease a sore throat, sores in the mouth, and inflammations in the mouth and throat. Not only is Calendula a wonderful healing and medicinal herb, but it is also a lovely and useful plant in the garden! Calendula repels many common garden pests including aphids, eelworms, asparagus beetles, and tomato hornworms, and is a companion plant for potatoes, beans, and lettuce. Plus, it grows quickly and is easy to cultivate from seed. The fresh vibrant petals can be used to color butter, cheese, custards, sauces, or sprinkled atop salads, cakes, and sandwiches.
vmehigan
10/17/13
Let us not forget that in Colonial times, when shipments of coffee would run dry, the homesteaders used Chicory Root as a coffee subsitute. Chicory is an herb and you'll often see it growing wild throughout NewEngland and North America's cooler climate states. It's easily detected by the blue daisy-like flowers and is often considered a weed/nusance to gardeners. The root would be baked, ground and brewed as one would coffee. You may not be aware that when you receive a beautiful salad with "curly endive," that it's actually Chicory leaves! The buds are also edible and sometimes served blanched. Additionally, farmers have considered Chicory a forage crop for livestock for hundreds of years. Chicory came to America (and other places too, like Australia) on ships from Europe, where it's a native plant.
vmehigan
10/17/13
There are many species of Goldenrod. The new leaves of some species were used by native American Indians for food. Historically, goldenrod (Solidago virgaurea), also called European goldenrod, has been used topically for wound healing. In fact, the name Solidago means "to make whole." In traditional medical practices, goldenrod has been used to treat tuberculosis, diabetes, enlargement of the liver, gout, hemorrhoids, internal bleeding, asthma, and rheumatic illnesses (disorders of the muscles and joints). Topical preparations of goldenrod are used in folk medicine to treat inflammation of the mouth and throat as well as slow-healing wounds. Today, goldenrod is primarily used as an aquaretic agent, meaning that it promotes the loss of water from the body (as compared to a diuretic, which promotes the loss of both water and electrolytes such as salt). It is used frequently in Europe to treat urinary tract inflammation and to prevent or treat kidney stones. In fact, goldenrod is commonly found in teas (typically with other herbs including uva ursi) to help "flush out" kidney stones and alleviate inflammatory diseases of the urinary tract. Laboratory studies have found that active compounds in goldenrod help reduce inflammation, relieve muscle spasms, and lower blood pressure. Some studies also suggest that it may have antioxidant effects. This herb has not been extensively studied in people. Source: www.organic-herb.com
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