Colonial Sense logo
Home
     
Login:
Member:      Password:
Remember Me Lost your info?    
Colonial Sense NavBar Start


   Featured Articles

   Community
     10 Questions
     Event Calendar
     Downloads
     Business District
     Online Resources
     Marketplace
     Town Square Forums
     Broadsheet Archive
     Ye Olde CS Shoppe

   Society-Lifestyle
     Holidays
     Signs of the Times
     Food and Farming
     Recipes
     Colonial Dictionary
     Colonial Quotes
     Kolonial Kids

   Antiques
     Furniture
     Other Antiques
     Auction Results
       January, 2010
       March, 2010
       April, 2010
       May, 2010
       Keno Inaugural Auction
         May 1-2, 2010

       June, 2010
       August, 2010
       September, 2010
       October, 2010
       November, 2010
       January, 2011
       March, 2011
       Signs of Spring at Pook
         and Pook

       April, 2011
       May, 2011
       June, 2011
       July, 2011
       August, 2011
       September, 2011
       October, 2011
       November, 2011
       January, 2012
       February, 2012
       March, 2012
       April, 2012
       May, 2012
       June, 2012
       August, 2012
       September, 2012
       October, 2012
       November, 2012
       January, 2013
       February, 2013
       March, 2013
       April, 2013
       Conestoga Auctions:
         June, 2013

       June, 2013
       July, 2013
       August, 2013
       September, 2013
       October, 2013
       November, 2013
       January, 2014
       February, 2014
       March, 2014

   How-To Guides
     Crafts
     Interior
     Outdoors
     Restoration

   Architecture
     Houses
     Towns

   Regional History
     Timeline
     Trivia Challenge
     Journals
     Oddities

   Colonial Sense
     FAQ
     Contact Us
     Advertising
     Member Info
     About Us

Colonial Sense NavBar End

Related Items
Successful Antique Hunting Secrets Revealed
Ebook -- How To Find And Invest In Valuable Antique Bargains That Will Maximize Your Personal Possessions.
Antique Secrets
Discover The Secrets Of Expert Antique Hunters That Few People Ever Get To Know About. How To Hunt Down Bargain Antiques For Pleasure And For Profit. This 90 Page Ebook Comes With A Free Coin Collecting Ebook Bonus & A Free Mini-course.
Antique Furniture - How To Find It And Fix It!
An Upholsterer (30 Yrs. Experience) Gives Tricks, Tips & Techniques To Restore, Refinish And Reupholster Furniture. You Just Won't Find This Info Anywhere Else!
Antiques Collectibles And eBay® Selling Tips
Iwantcollectibles Provides Tips And Advice For Anyone With An Antiques, Collectibles Or eBay® Business! Learn About Buying And Selling Antiques And Collectibles, eBay® Consignment, And General eBay® Buying And Selling Tips.

 

Auction Results

January, 2012



Click on images for larger view
Fraktur by Rev. Henry Young (Centre County, Pennsylvania, 1792-1861), Watercolor on paper with couple featuring Young's typical yellow dress on the woman. Records a later birth in Centre County, 1868. Creasing. In a late curly maple frame, 12"h. 9 1/4"w. Birth information filled in on blank lines by later hand. Top and bottom edges folded down 1/2" to fit frame, approx. 10 pinholes on left side, 2 go into skirt of dress. Birth information filled in on blank lines by later hand. Top and bottom edges folded down 1/2" to fit frame, approx. 10 pinholes on left side, 2 go into skirt of dress. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $2,000-4,000
Realized Price: $8,813

Carved Powder Horn, Engraved "Asahel Taet His Horn 1776 Ticonderoga 18 September," along with birds and deer. 13 1/2"l. Ex McGuire estate of Tallmadge, Ohio. According to tradition, this horn descended in the Doolittle family, which had settled in Ohio by the middle of the 19th century. Missing cap and plug, 2" by 4" chunk has been broken and glued. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $400-800
Realized Price: $3,643

Portrait of a Boy Attributed to Joseph Whiting Stock (Massachusetts, 1815-1855), Oil on canvas, unsigned. Full-length portrait of a boy dressed in blue with whip and pull wagon, ca.1845-1855. 43"h. 27"w., in a gilded ogee molded frame, 49 1/4"h. 33 1/4"w. Ex Jean Massar (Ohio). Professional restoration including cleaning and rebacking on canvas with a new stretcher. Small areas of repair including 1" x 1" "T" shape tear near curve in whip, touch up in top of whip, pinpoint inpainted flakes at top of right side of belt, 2"l. tear above chair rail on left side. Right side of canvas shows distress from stretcher (creasing, crazing and some flaking at bottom corner). Repainted gold frame is 1st half 20th century. The boy originally held a book and it was repainted (possibly in the period by the artist) to have him holding the pull toy; this book is now partially visible, perhaps exposed during the most recent conservation and cleaning. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $3,500-5,500
Realized Price: $7,344

Trammel and Betty Lamp, American, 19th century, oak and iron. Oak trammel retaining its original patina and an iron betty lamp with a heart finial. 33"h. Ex Bill Samaha (Ohio). Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $200-400
Realized Price: $1,763

Stepback Cupboard, Ohio Mennonite, 3rd quarter-19th century, mixed woods including poplar and walnut. Two-piece, the upper section with one nine-pane door, the lower section with two paneled doors, all resting on recessed feet. Retains its original grungy finish. Minor imperfections. 73"h. 41 1/2"w. 17"d. Sold at Blair Auctions in 1990, ex Delagrange (Ohio). A few panes reglazed, top and bottom lived in different spaces for some time, lower-side moldings appear to be good replacements. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $1,000-2,000
Realized Price: $10,575

Pair of Bennington Poodles, Vermont, mid 19th century, flint enamel. Standing poodles with coleslaw fur, baskets and amber glaze with touch of blue. 8 1/2"h. Ex Moe Pierson (Ohio). Crack around base on tail of one poodle. There is also a small flake on one foot of the same poodle. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000
Realized Price: $7,638

Tinder Lighter, England, early 19th century. Flintlock with mahogany pistol grip and brass pan and lyre support. Marked "Jones" with weapons and Union Jack shield. 5"l. Ex Tom Brown (Pennsylvania). Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.
Estimate $ 300-500
Realized Price: $1,234

Candlemold, American, 19th century, pine and pewter. Twenty-four pewter tubes in a pine frame. Fine old surface. 19"h. 20 3/4"l. Ex Charles Momchilov (Ohio). Tight age cracks to the ends, no tubes appear to be damaged. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $400-800
Realized Price: $1,116

Patriotic Wafer Iron, American, early 19th century, iron. Depicts a profile bust of Washington surrounded by "George Washington President of the United States" and laurel leaves, and engraved on the exterior "No. 31." 28 3/4"l. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $300-600
Realized Price: $4,348

Chippendale Candlestand, American, late 18th century, appears to be maple or birch. Porringer top over a columnar shaft and resting on snake feet. Retains a wonderful old, grungy surface. 26 1/4"h. 21"w. 20 1/2"w. Ex Charles Momchilov (Ohio). Old nailed repair at the base of the shaft, top has been off and reattached. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $800-1,200
Realized Price: $4,818

Queen Anne Armchair, New England, mid 18th century, maple. Baroque crest with a vasiform splat, scrolled arms, turned legs and stretchers, and Spanish feet. Imperfections. 15"h. seat, 45 1/2"h. overall. Ex Charles Momchilov (Ohio). Repaired break to one stile, proper right edge of splat restored, height loss (original Spanish feet, but about 2/3 missing), refinished, replaced rush seat. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate: $500-1,000
Realized Price: $2,585

Sheraton Lady's Desk, Found in Mantua, Portage County, Ohio, 1820-1840, curly maple and poplar. Solid, highly figured maple, with three paneled doors above a folding writing surface over a long drawer, all resting on turned legs. 47"h. 31 1/4"w. 17 1/4"d. (closed), writing surface is 29 1/2"h. Older refinish, replaced pulls. Illustrated in Hageman, Ohio Furniture Makers Volume 2, p. 57. Sold at Garth's Auction January 7, 2012.

Estimate $ 1,500-2,500
Realized Price: $6,756

Chester County, Pennsylvania Chippendale mahogany tall case clock, ca. 1795, the eight-day works, signed Benj Garrett Goshen, retaining an old mellow surface, 94 1/4" h. Illustrated in Schiffer Furniture and its Makers of Chester County, Pennsylvania, fig. 47. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $10,000-$15,000
Realized Price: $45,030

Pennsylvania Chippendale walnut drop leaf dining table, ca. 1770, with notched corners and ball and claw feet, 29" h., 19" w., 48" d. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $3,000-$4,000
Realized Price: $5,925

Southeastern Pennsylvania William & Mary banister back armchair, ca. 1735, the back with punched star decoration, retaining an old black surface. Illustrated in Schiffer Furniture and its Makers of Chester County, Pennsylvania, fig. 157. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $15,000-$25,000
Realized Price: $28,440

Pair of southeastern Pennsylvania William & Mary banister back dining chairs, ca. 1730, each with scalloped and pierced crest and rush seat. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $8,000-$12,000
Realized Price: $16,590

Chester County, Pennsylvania Westtown School needlework, dated 1813, wrought by Hannah Poole, 8 3/4" x 8 1/2". Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $1,000-$2,000
Realized Price: $5,688

Large German carved and painted Noah's Ark, 19th c. to include 129 animals and figures, 33" l., 21" h. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $5,000-$10,000
Realized Price: $21,330

Charles II beadwork basket, late 17th c., initialed EG, 5 1/2" h., 24" w., 18" d. A similar example was sold at Sotheby's on April 9, 2009, lot 34. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $2,000-$4,000
Realized Price: $24,885

Chester County, Pennsylvania William & Mary walnut desk on frame, ca. 1745, with a scalloped slant lid and single drawer, 42" h., 34 1/2" w. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $4,000-$8,000
Realized Price: $30,810

Rare Philadelphia mahogany valuables chest on stand, ca. 1720, the upper section with nine small drawers resting on an attached base with a single drawer and baluster turned legs joined by flat serpentine stretchers, 26" h., 17" w. For a nearly identical chest, probably made in the same shop, see Griffith, Lee Ellen The Pennsylvania Spice Box, figure 4-9 and PMA Worldly Goods, fig. 162. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $20,000-$40,000
Realized Price: $112,575

Rare Delaware Valley walnut William & Mary banister back armchair, ca. 1715, the crest rail initialed S.H. between two cutout diamonds. A nearly identical chair in the collection of Winterthur Museum is illustrated in Forman American Seating Furniture 1630-1730, figure 30. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $15,000-$25,000
Realized Price: $26,070

Northern colonies red oak wainscot armchair, ca. 1710, with a paneled back and plank seat supported by block and baluster turned legs. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $5,000-$8,000
Realized Price: $16,590

Pennsylvania painted pine chest of drawers dated 1855, attributed to Jacob Knagy, Somerset County and inscribed Benjamin Mast, the drawers with stenciled urns, flowers, pinwheels, etc. on a red ground, 44" h., 29" w. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $3,000-$6,000
Realized Price: $15,405

Massive eight gallon stoneware butter churn, 19th c., with extensive blue floral decoration, 23 3/4" h. Provenance: Harry Hartman. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $1,500-$2,000
Realized Price: $5,214

Pennsylvania tole decorated tin coffee pot, late 19th c., with vibrant leaf and floral decoration on a red ground, 10 1/4" h. Provenance: Harry Hartman; Keller-Keener family, Manheim. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $8,000-$10,000
Realized Price: $15,405

Wilhelm Schimmel (Cumberland Valley, Pennsylvania, 1817-1890), carved and polychrome painted spread winged eagle, late 19th c., 6" h., 11" w. Provenance: Harry Hartman. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $5,000-$10,000
Realized Price: $11,258

John Rasmussen (American, 1828-1895), oil on zinc Views of the buildings and surroundings of the Berks County Almshouse, signed lower right, 32" x 40". Exhibited at the Abby Aldrich Rockefellar Folk Art Center, October 1-December 8, 1968. A similar view was sold at Pook & Pook, Inc. on 10/4/2008. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $15,000-$25,000
Realized Price: $33,180

Maryland or Virginia painted pine miniature blanket chest, early 19th c., the lid and front decorated with tulip trees, flanking segmented circles, 8 1/2" h., 14" w. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $3,000-$4,000
Realized Price: $21,330

Massive carved giltwood spread winged eagle figure, ca. 1810, 27" h., 60" w. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $2,000-$4,000
Realized Price: $16,590

Pennsylvania or Maryland Windsor bench, ca. 1790, with a low back, knuckle hand grips, and bulbous lower stretchers, retaining an old red painted surface, 31 1/2" h., 84" w. This bench is pictured in Santore The Windsor Style in American, plate 206. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $14,000-$18,000
Realized Price: $21,330

Rare Alamance Co., North Carolina earthenware sugar bowl and cover with small applied strap handles, early 19th c., with vibrant yellow and black splash decoration on a brick red ground, 7 3/4" h. An identical bowl is pictured in Hunter & Beckerdite Ceramics in America, figure 64. Provenance: Bought by Titus Geesey from Joe Kindig, York, Pennsylvania, 1930. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $10,000-$20,000
Realized Price: $37,920

Delaware Valley Queen Anne walnut dressing table, ca. 1765, the notched corner top overhanging a case with five drawers and beaded edge apron supported by cabriole legs terminating in Spanish feet, 30 3/4" h., 29 3/4" w. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $8,000-$12,000
Realized Price: $28,440



Rhode Island painted sleigh, ca. 1840, the decoration attributed to Thomas Frederick Hoppin (1816-1873) and descended in the Babbitt family of Providence and Kingston, Rhode Island, retaining a vibrant surface with a rural landscape and tasseled swags on a yellow ground, the interior with blue stippling and original upholstered seat. 55" h., 77 1/2" w., 42" d. Exhibited at Rhode Island School of Design A Well Furnished World, 1830-1860, February and March, 1988. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $5,000-$10,000
Realized Price: $14,220

Important Philadelphia Queen Anne walnut tall case clock, mid 18th c., the sarcophagus bonnet with ball and spire finials and open fretwork enclosing an eight-day works with brass face, signed Edw. Duffield, Philadelphia, above a case with an arched door and bracket feet. This clock, from one of Philadelphia's earliest and best known makers, remains in a remarkable state of preservation with its original finials, fretwork, full sarcophagus, and feet, as well as an old dry surface, 101" h. Provenance: A New Jersey Educational Institution. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $35,000-$55,000
Realized Price: $118,500

Rare Philadelphia Queen Anne walnut fire screen with candlestand, ca. 1760, the oblong screen with fixed demilune candle shelf, above a baluster standard supported by cabriole legs terminating in pad feet, 47" h. According to family tradition, the stand was originally owned by Philadelphian abolitionist, Anthony Benezet (1713-1784) and descended in a Quaker family to the present owners. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $3,000-$5,000
Realized Price: $49770

Four pair of Moravian wrought iron ram's horn hinges, ca. 1800, largest - 25 7/8" l. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $500-$1,000
Realized Price: $4,503

Pennsylvania scherenschnitte valentine, early/mid 19th c., 12 1/2" x 12 1/4". Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $400 - $600
Realized Price: $770

Cantwell's Bridge, Delaware Chippendale mahogany chest of drawers, inscribed Made by Peregrine Janvier Appquinimink July 1804, 34 1/2" h., 39 1/2" w. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $3,000-$5,000
Realized Price: $21,330

Red, yellow, green, and black rainbow spatter swirl plate, 19th c., 6 1/4" dia. Sold at Pook and Pook January 13-14, 2012.

Estimated: $2,000-$4,000
Realized Price: $10,665

The Drake Family Carved and Painted Joined Chest with Drawer
Attributed to the Deacon John Moore (1614-1677) Shop Tradition, Foliated Vine Group Windsor, Connecticut,circa 1675-1690


This joined chest is a masterpiece and very rare survival of its form. With its extensively carved surface, oak lid, sides double paneled over a single panel, and back finished with three panels and finished moldings on all four sides, it is the most elaborate and fully developed American Colonial three-panel chest known. It has survived in remarkable condition, retaining its original surface and much of its original painted decoration.

This chest was possibly originally owned by John (1622-1688) and Hannah (Moore) Drake (1616-1686), of Windsor (later Simsbury), Connecticut. It might also have been a wedding gift for their son, Enoch Drake (1655-1698), who married Sarah Porter (1655-1730) on November 11, 1680. This chest descended to Enoch and Sarah Drake's son, Enoch (1683-1776) and his wife Elizabeth (1685-1717) and next to their daughter, Elizabeth (1707-1802), who married John Gillett (1707-1800). It continued through successive generations of the Gillett, Ward and Riddle branches of their family directly to the current owners.

Although John Drake was himself a woodworker from the Drake family tradition in Windsor, this chest is believed to be the work of Hannah (Moore) Drake's brother, Deacon John Moore (1614-1677), a pioneer and settler of Windsor who established a multi-generational family woodworking tradition. In 1630, he emigrated from England with his father Thomas Moore (1584-1645), along with three puritan ministers -- the Reverends John White, John Warham and John Maverick - and other congregants to establish a religious community in Dorchester, Massachusetts. In 1635, they relocated their community to land north of Hartford on the banks of the Connecticut River, which they named Windsor, after Windsor, Berkshire, England. Deacon Moore was very active in Windsor, serving as Deacon of the First Congregational Church as well as selectman from 1653 to 1674. He was also responsible for building the school house and the meeting house, among other town contracts, for which he was paid in land grants. He secured land on the West side of Windsor (now Simsbury), for his sister Hannah and brother-in-law John Drake.

This chest is part of Deacon Moore's foliated vine group, so named for the distinctive ornamentation consisting of symmetrical patterns of floral motifs and vines. Approximately 30 boxes are known that stem from this group as well as a table at the Connecticut Historical Society and two joined chests. One of the aforementioned chests in a private collection displays a four panel front. The other example in the collection of Old Sturbridge Village from the Moore shop was possibly made by Nathaniel Gaylord (1656-1720), who was trained in the craft tradition. The present chest and the Old Sturbridge Village example are very similar in their three paneled form and foliate ornamentation, although this one is more elaborately carved and paneled in addition to being finished on the back. For additional information on Deacon John Moore and his work, see Joshua W. Lane and Donald P. White III, ""Fashioning Furniture and Framing Community: Woodworkers and the Rise of a Connecticut River Valley Town,"" American Furniture 2005, edited by Luke Beckerdite, pp. 178-188.

Provenance: Originally owned by John (1622-1688) and Hannah (Moore) Drake (1616-1686) or by their son, Enoch Drake (1655-1698), who married Sarah Porter (1655-1730) on November 11, 1680
To Enoch and Sarah's son, Enoch Drake (1683-1676), who married Elizabeth Barber (1685-1717)
To their daughter, Elizabeth Drake (1707-1802), who married John Gillett (1707-1800)
To their son, Jabez Gillett (1738-1818), who married Anne Loomis (1741-1795)
To their son, Horace Gillett (1779-1868), who married Rachel Austin (1781-1849)
To their son, Horace Cornelius Gillett (1806-1876), who married Sarah Ann Watson (1814-1879)
To their daughter, Ellen Caroline Gillett (1842-1920), who married Lorenzo Ward (1826-1890)
To their daughter, Edith Clara Ward (1875-1958), who married Joseph Bingham Riddle (1862-1964)
Thence by descent in the family to the current owners.

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $100,000-$150,000
Realized Price: $632,400

Fancy-Painted and Gilt Federal Card Table, attributed to Thomas Seymour (1771-1848), the decoration attributed to the school of John Ritto Penniman (1782-1841) possibly executed by Joshua Holden (1781-1852), Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1808-1812, h. 30 5/8 in.; w. 35 7/8 in.; d. 17 3/8 in. (closed)

Provenance: From the family house of Edward Allen (1737-1803), Derby Street, Salem, Massachusetts. At his death, the house and its contents remained the property of his descendants;

Thence through the family to Teresa Lovering Merriam (b. May 11, 1880) of Nahant, Massachusetts, who likely inherited the house and its contents from her parents, Frank (1850-1924) and Teresa Beatrice Lovering Merriam (1854-1877). She never married and died without issue; At her death, she left her house and its contents to the family of the present owner.

Literature: Mussey, Robert and Christopher Shelton, "John Penniman and the Ornamental Painting Tradition in Federal-Era Boston," American Furniture 2010, edited by Luke Beckerdite, Hanover and London: The Chipstone Foundation, 2010, Fig. 10, p. 9.

Other Notes: Remarkably surviving with most of its original painted decoration intact, this sophisticated card table represents the combined effort of two of Boston's most pre-eminent craftsmen of the Federal era - the cabinetmaker Thomas Seymour (1771-1848) and the decorative painter John Penniman (1782-1841). It is one of the earliest extant examples of its form with a top that rotates around a threaded iron pivot rod to reveal an inner well for cards and game pieces. The Moroccan leather on the upper edges of the rails indicates that it is also the work of one of the immigrant morocco leather tanners that Seymour employed to add elegant enhancements to his furniture. It was made between 1808 and 1812, during a period in which Thomas Seymour made his finest work in collaboration with highly skilled craftsmen.

This table appears illustrated in the article "John Penniman and the Ornamental Painting Tradition in Federal-Era Boston," written by Robert Mussey and Christopher Shelton and published in American Furniture 2010 . Mussey and Shelton attribute the table to Thomas Seymour on the basis of its fastidious construction, square shaping of the legs, paneled therm foot design, and distinctive use of kerfed and bent glue blocks on the underside. The painted decoration is attributed to Penniman's shop on the basis of its shared similarities with the only extant piece of his signed work, a pier table inscribed "Painted in M __ 1809 by John P__niman" currently in the collection of the Nichols House Museum in Boston. In 1809, Penniman rented space in Thomas Seymour's warehouse on Common Street. That fact combined with the pier table's distinctive hardware, use of ash as a secondary wood, and construction details attribute it to Thomas Seymour's shop.

As seen articulated on the supports of the aforementioned pier table, the present card table displays painted acanthus leaved on the legs perhaps inspired by the "Ornament for a Tablet & Various Leaves" illustrated as pl. 2 in Thomas Sheraton's Cabinet-Makers and Upholsterer's Drawing Book (1802). Penniman painted his acanthus leaves with rounded tips and curl at the ends, in different shades of brown oil glaze applied in multiple layers with short fluid brushstrokes, to create the illusion of shadows and depth. He also used pale or drab gray paint to simulate shadows on the right and below his leafage and panels, to give his work dimension and the illusion of a light source at the upper left. The latter technique is a signature detail found in all of his work. The interior wells of this card table appear to retain remnants of their original dark gray paint - the same shade used for the borders on the rest of the table - beneath the layer of blue paint.

This table stems from the same suite of furniture as four painted and gilded birch fancy chairs, one of which bears the stenciled name "Holden." One in the collection of Winterthur Museum is marked "I" on the underside of the chair and on the caned seat frame. It also displays "$6" written in pencil on the inner surface of the rear seat rail. One in a private collection on loan to the New York State Museum is marked "II" and inscribed "Holdens." Israel Sack Inc. formerly owned the aforementioned chairs and two others. They are referenced in Israel Sack, Inc., American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, Volume VII: 1818, no. 5011, IX: 2439, no. 5011, X: 2705, no. 6341. One with an upholstered seat is illustrated in a Kinnaman & Ramaeker advertisement in The Magazine Antiques (March 1985): 506.

The chairs exhibit virtually identical painted decoration to this table - a stylized shell surrounded by leaves, acanthus leaves on the legs with prominent central veins, roundels, distinctive shadowing in two shades of gray, and use of several shades of brown glaze. The name "Holdens" found on one of these chairs perhaps refers to Joshua Holden (1781-1852), a Boston chair maker and painter. He appears in Boston tax records in 1807 working in partnership with Asa Jones and later worked from 1808 to 1811 as an independent craftsman on Washington Street, close to Thomas Seymour's furniture warehouse. As Thomas Seymour often commissioned other craftsman to make furniture which he later sold, he perhaps had Holden make or decorate this suite of furniture. Given that the painted decoration closely relates to Penniman's oeuvre, the artisan who executed it was clearly familiar with his style and was likely trained or employed by him at one time.

This table has the same family history as a bombe chest-on-chest originally owned by Captain Edward Allen (1737-1803), a merchant of Salem, Massachusetts, that sold at Sotheby's, Important Americana, January 23-4, 2009, sale 8512, lot 174. In 1759, he married Ruth (1728-1774), the widow of Israel Gardner and daughter of Gamaliel Hodges, and sister of the wife of Richard Derby. After her death in 1774, he married Margaret Lockart (d. 1808) of North Carolina in 1778. He and his family lived in Salem at a house located at 125 Derby Street, at the corner of Hardy Street, which stands today. He had ten children: Edward (1763-1845), who married Anna Fisk (1770-1826) in 1798; Sarah, who married Stephen Webb in Salem in 1779; Ruth Hodges (1759-1849), who married Thomas Porter of Topsfield in 1785; Alice (b. 1765), who married Captain Josiah Orne (d. 1825) of Salem in 1786; Alexander (1778-1804); John (1779-1814); Sally (d. age 7); Jordan (1781-1797); Nancy (1784-1806); and Betsy (1787-1827). Although not originally owned by Edward Allen, this table came into the family house through one of his descendants. The house and its contents were inherited by Teresa Lovering Merriam (b. 1880) of Nahant, who never married and died without issue in the mid 20th century. At her death, she gifted her house and its contents to the ancestors of the present owner. As one of the children of Frank Merriam (1850-1924) and Teresa Beatrice Lovering Merriam (1854-1877), she presumably inherited the house from her parents.

Property of a New England Gentleman.

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $50,000-$100,000
Realized Price: $347,200

A Diminutive Federal Mahogany Upholstered Settee

The carving attributed to Samuel McIntire (1757-1811) Salem, Massachusetts, circa 1800-1811 With its exposed mahogany arms and crest rail, this sofa represents a version of the camelback sofa form unique to Salem, where it first appeared in the 1790s and became one of the most desirable furniture forms associated with Samuel McIntire (1757-1811). His examples dating to the early nineteenth century were articulated with a distinctive basket of fruit and flowers carved into the crest panel with a star punch ground, beneath a molded edge of alternating C-scrolls with chip carved edges. McIntire carefully conceived the basket to fit snugly into the arch of the crest panel, giving it a tilted perspective to heighten the three-dimensional effect and accommodate a vantage point from above. No two baskets found on extant sofas are identical, suggesting McIntire did not copy a stock design but rather sketched out each design before executing it. The spiral acanthus rosette on the scrolled ends of the arms was inspired by classical ceiling motifs from antiquity illustrated in architectural pattern books, such as Matthias Darly’s Ornamental Architect, or Young Artists Instructor (London, 1774). McIntire used this type of rosette for virtually all of his sofa commissions. Two surviving receipts from the shop of the Salem cabinetmakers, Elijah and Jacob Sanderson, one dated July 31, 1802 and another dated February 3, 1802, indicate that McIntire was paid 1.07.0 pounds for “Carving Sofa & working the top rail ” Retaining an old surface and originally upholstered in black horsehair fabric, this example is one of the most diminutive of its form. It displays McIntire’s virtuoso carving in its complex array of fruit and flowers and scrolled arms accentuated with rosettes and waterleaves. Very similar carving is found on a camelback sofa made for the double parlors of the brick townhouse McIntire designed in Salem in 1804 for John and Sarah Gardner, Elias Hasket Derby’s nephew and his wife. While the carving is the work of McIntire, the sofa may have been made by Nathaniel Safford, who provided a great deal of new furniture for the house in 1805. Referred to today as the Gardner-Pingree House, this commission has long been recognized as McIntire’s finest surviving work. Less than a dozen other camelback sofas attributed to McIntire with baskets of fruit and flowers have been identified. These include one in a private collection sold at Sotheby’s, January 17-9, 1997, lot 917, one at Winterthur Museum, one in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, one in a private collection in Essex, Massachusetts, one in a private collection in Baltimore, Maryland, one in a private collection in Connecticut, one with a history in the Andrews family bequeathed to Williams College in 1956 and later sold to Ginsburg & Levy, and one sold at Christie’s, October 13, 1983, lot 294. Provenance: Christie’s, New York, October 19, 1990, lot 328; Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Eddy Nicholson; Christie’s, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Eddy Nicholson, January 27-8, 1995, sale 8082, lot 1145 ( sold for 134,500.00 including BP. )

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $40,000-$80,000
Realized Price: $86,800

Pair of Diminutive Early Classical Carved Giltwood Girondale Mirrors, Labeled by C.N. Robinson, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1813-1822

Each with carved eagles with spread wings holding a chain and ball in their beaks and standing on a shaped plinth with gilt spherules flanked by scrolled gilt acanthus leaves above a convex glass with circular molded frame hung with gilt spherules flanked by two scrolled candle arms with glass candle cups and cylindrical brass nozzles over an acanthus leaf-carved pendant.

One girondole eagle bears label ""C.N. Robinson, Carver and Gilder, looking-glass frame and picture frame manufacturer, no. 56, South Street, offers for sale, an assortment of girandoles, brackets, cornices, &c. &c., Also a great variety of profile frames n.b. old glasses resilvered" h. 36 in.; w. 21 1/2 in. (each)

Provenance: Private Collection, Charlestown, Massachusetts
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Silver, Folk Art, and Decorative Arts, June 17, 1992, lot 132

Literature: For similar examples featured by Charles N. Robinson see Peter Strickland, "Documented Philadelphia Looking Glasses, 1800-1850," in Antiques Magazine (April, 1976), p.794

Other Notes: Between 1811-1857 Charles N. Robinson made and sold picture frames and looking glasses. His shop was located at 56 South Street from 1813-1822, which is the period that the present examples were likely made.

Property of a New York Family

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $15,000-$25,000
Realized Price: $40,300


Colombia Blown Flask

A Very Rare Clear with Blue Tint Corn Flower Columbia blown Flask
Thirteen small six-pointed stars in semi-circle above bust. On reverse, a large American Eagle, head turned to right, nine vertical bars on shield. With Pontilled base. H. 7 in., W. 4 in., D. 2 1/4 in.

Provenance: From a Rhode Island family home

Literature: American Glass, George S. and Helen McKearin, pp. 537- 538.

Other Notes: Van Rensselaer in describing his No. 20 states no stars. "However, while stars are faint they definitely appear in each of the few specimens of this flask known to us, including the one from which Van Rensselaer's listing was taken."

Property of a New England Gentleman.

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $5,000-$10,000
Realized Price: $24,800

Prior-Hamblin School, BLUE-EYE BABY IN A ROCKING BASKET HOLDING CHERRIES AND WEARING A WHITE DRESS WITH A PINK SASH, The canopy decorated with pink ribbons and tassels, Circa 1835, Oil on canvas, 27 x 22 inches

The present owner remembers seeing this portrait in the 1960s hanging in her great aunt's family home in Wellesley, Massachusetts. The identity of the baby in the cradle has yet to be identified, but there is some writing painted at the base of the cradle. A second portrait descended with it, which the consignor remembers as well, but it was left to another branch of the family. This portrait of the baby in the cradle with cherries was taken off the wall of the consignor's home this past summer when it was consigned for auction.

Provenance: Descended in the Doane family of Winthrop, Massachusetts. Given to the Consignor by her great aunt, Rachel May Doane Taylor of Wellesley, Massachusetts in the 1980s. Possible line of descent: Samuel Belcher (b. 1790) m. May Whiting of Winthrop, Massachusetts Francis Champlain Doane (b. 1821) and Caroline Augusta Belcher (b. 1826) of Winthrop, Massachusetts Sisters Jeanette Augusta Doane and Carrie May Doane Albee (b. 1867), both of Athol, Massachusetts Rachael May Doane Taylor of Wellesley, Massachusetts Who gave the painting to her great niece, the present consignor, in the 1980s

Property of an East Coast Lady

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $25,000-$35,000
Realized Price: $182,600

Figured Maple Lynx/Bobcat Effigy Ladle, Central to Woodlands mythology was the Manitou known as the Mishipizheu, or the Underwater Panther. This spirit creature was a powerful mix of a wild cat or lynx, serpent and horned bison and/or deer. Sculptural and pictorial depictions of this being extend back to the Mississippian Culture (800 - 1500).

Within the Brams collection one will see several ladles and bowls with diagnostic elements that represent this creature. This is one of the most important examples known. The surface color and patina are extremely desirable.

Looking head on at this powerful sculpture, one should take note of the outline formed by the top of the head and the ears (please see back cover of present catalogue). This outline in full or in part can be seen on several important effigies bowls and ladles as the basis for the Manitou effigy. A related panther sculpture (dating from A.D. 1000-1500) illustrating this upper head outline is in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution (#240915).
Out of context and without this aid the meaning of this form or reductive variations of it are hard to determine as anything meaningful. It may be argued that even within the Woodlands culture of the late 19th century the true meaning of these elements might have been lost to some of the carvers, cut they continued to include them into their crafts as they had already been deeply imbedded as part of their sculptural vernacular.

The lynx ladle seen herein is the only known example of its kind. The airy open carving between the animals front legs and body and the commanding posture it desplays is remarkable. The quality and sculptural quality of the piece is compelling and engaging. It is interesting to note that the posture seen here is strikingly similar to that of the Thompson Family human effigy ladle (Lot 322).

The artist who conceived and carved this ladle expressed a sense of movement and action unusual in a piece with only one figure. The large feline predator is shown climbing the handle of the ladle as if it were the trunk of a tree. It is perched there looking out over the landscape, on the alert for its prey and its next meal. As such it is a symbol of watchfulness, stealth, strength, and the potential for action, all of which are essential functions of the male hunter or warrior.

-Evan M. Maurer, Director Emeritus, The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, December 2011
L. 7 7/8 inches

The Peter Brams Collection

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $30,000-$50,000
Realized Price: $89,900

The Thompson Family Seated Human Effigy Feast Ladle, Algonquian, first half 18th century. This important Delaware region human effigy feast ladle is very large in scale which gives it a strong sculptural presence. The bowl is carved exceptionally thin and the figure sitting atop the incurvate crook of the handle has delicate open carving between the arms and legs. Above the figure's proper right eye is a carved feather pattern (likely representing a tattoo or headdress). A small cavity is present on the chest where the heart would be, (it is unclear whether this was carved or incidental to age). It maintains an extremely desirable dry surface with remarkable patination to the figure.

Provenance: The ladle was found decades ago in the basement of the Alexander Thompson homestead, in Thompson Ridge, Orange County, New York.

The figure seen here is powerfully portrayed. The face is minimally carved with only the eyes and nose delineated (there is no mouth). This reductive carving is representative of great Woodlands sculpture; the maker was looking to capture the essence of the subject--it is not an attempt at portraiture. Similar faces are seen on pre-contact stone maskettes (please see Willoughby, Antiquities of the New England Indians. Cambridge: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, 1973, p.163) and on an important Southern New England ash burl human effigy bowl (Powers, North American Burl Treen: Colonial & Native American. Brooklyn, NY, 2005, pps. 100-102).

The full figure sits with backside to the ground, knees up and arms forward. The same seated posture has ancient precedents and is seen on Woodlands works dating back to at least 50 b.c.-a.d. 250 (Brose, Ancient Art of the American Woodlands Indians, p. 67).
It has also been found on a small sample of ladles and pipes. A smaller Mohawk ladle (American Museum of Natural History catalogue no. 50.1/1555) collected at the Saint Regis Reservation, Franklin Co., NY displays a similar character (though seated in the opposite direction). Another related effigy ladle (private collection), descended within a Herkimer Co., NY family, also presents a full-seated figure which faces the bowl.

William Thompson (ca. 1700- ca. 1780) came from England to America in 1729 and settled near Hamptonburgh, Orange Co., NY (The Original Houses on Thompson Ridge 1778-1822). He later acquired 600 acres and his three sons, Alexander (1739-1814), Andrew (ca. 1741-1804), and Robert (1742-1832) divided the property between them. Alexander took the best lot and built a fine home and a working farm. His son, Alexander II (1782-1868) later took over the property and became one of the area's most successful farmers (Seese, Old Orange Houses, Vol II, 1941, p.85). In 1803, Alexander II married Hannah Bull (1783-1865), a descendant of William Bull (1689-1775) and Sarah Wells (1694-1796), of Hamptonburgh, Orange Co., NY. Sarah Wells was the daughter of Christopher Denn, who was a partner of the original Wawayanda Patent. She was also the first permanent settler of Orange County. The story of Sarah Wells has been written about many times-here from the New York Times' article of September 14, 1884, ""William Bull's Fortune"": ""...a sixteen year old girl [Sarah Wells] trampling in the wilderness where no white man had ever been before, and not a civilized being lived, with wild men [Indians] as her guides...."" It is not unreasonable to speculate that Wells acquired this ladle as a gift from her Native guides or in trade with her Indian neighbors-and then it descended within the Bull/Thompson family line.

Though catalogued as first-half 18th century, it is possibly 17th century. The carving is unacculturated and judging from the wear and patination, it had years (if not generations) of ceremonial use before it passed into the hands of the colonial family. L. 12 in.

Provenance: William Thompson (ca. 1700- ca. 1780) came from England to America in 1729 and settled near Hamptonburgh, Orange Co., NY (THE ORIGINAL HOUSES ON THOMPSON RIDGE 1778-1822). He later acquired 600 acres and his three sons, Alexander (1739-1814), Andrew (ca. 1741-1804), and Robert (1742-1832) divided the property between them. Alexander took the best lot and built a fine home and a working farm. His son, Alexander II (1782-1868) later took over the property and became one of the areas most successful farmers (Seese, OLD ORANGE HOUSES, Vol II, 1941, p.85).In 1803, Alexander II married Hannah Bull (1783-1865), a descendant of William Bull (1689-1775) and Sarah Wells (1694-1796), of Hamptonburgh, Orange Co., NY. Sarah Wells was the daughter of Christopher Denn, who was a partner of the original Wawayanda Patent. She was also the first permanent settler of Orange County.The story of Sarah Wells has been written about many times-here from the New York Times, September 14, 1884, William Bull's Fortune, "...a sixteen year old girl [Sarah Wells] trampling in the wilderness where no white man had ever been before, and not a civilized being lived, with wild men [Indians] as her guides...." It is not unreasonable to speculate that Wells acquired this ladle as a gift from her Native guides or in trade through her Indian neighbors-and then it descended within the Bull/Thompson family line.

The Peter Brams Collection

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $40,000-$80,000
Realized Price: $68,200

Maple Burl Effigy Bowl, Sauk-Fox/Mesquikie, circa 1820

A bowl of startling quality. It is wafer thin with sophisticated lines an dexcellent color and surface.

The effigy here is an interpretation of a Manitou. The form is dynamic and almost animate in nature, its arms or wings outstretched taking one into the belly of the bowl. The head has a curious partially carved point to the center (it is not a hole, stopping at 1/16"" or so). It may represent the being's eye or a directional device.
H. 4 in., D. 13 1/8 in.

Provenance: Loras College, Dubuque, IA
Mr. & Mrs. Larry Frank, Arroyo Hondo, NM

Literature: Illustrated in: ART OF THE RED EARTH PEOPLE: THE MESQUAKIE OF IOWA, plate 125.

Powers, Steven S. North American Burl Treen: Colonial & Native American. Brooklyn, NY 2005. 118

The Peter Brams Collection

Sold at Keno Auctions January 17,2012.

Estimated: $40,000-$60,000
Realized Price: $62,000

[Colonial Ads -- click for more info]Colonial Sense Ad

Amazon Deals Start
On Sale!



See these
and other items in
Ye Olde CS Shoppe


Colonial Sense NavBar End

Colonial Sense Ad

Go2Top
Go to Top

Colonial Sense is an advocate for global consumer privacy rights, protection and security.
All material on this website © copyright 2009-14 by Colonial Sense, except where otherwise indicated.
ref:T3-S24-P9022-C-M